TRAVEL SURVEY SHOWS SAVVY COMUTERS USE MOTORCYCLES AND SCOOTERS
August 28 2009.


Motorcycles are making a bigger contribution to getting commuters to work than any other mode of transport, according to the MCI's analysis of the new National Travel Survey.

The survey shows that over half (52%) of all motorcycle trips in 2008 were made for the purpose of commuting, compared to just one-third (34%) of bicycle journeys and one-fifth (22%) of car journeys.  These findings challenge the myth that bikers are a nuisance on the road and more interested in leisure pursuits than the day to day convenience of a powered two-wheeler. They strengthen the case for motorcycling to take its place at the heart of mainstream transport policy as an everyday, practical mode of transport which can improve access to employment, education and social networks.
  • Congestion-busting:  the majority of car journeys are still single occupancy (60%) and this is notably higher for commuting and business trips (84%). If these solo drivers switched to two wheels, congestion would fall and journey times drop dramatically.
  • Affordable:  financial hurdles were one of the main deterrents to driving. For younger people this was particularly critical, with almost half (48%) of 17-20 year olds stating 'the cost of learning' was a reason for not driving.  A third (32%) of this age group said that the cost of buying a car was another key factor for not driving.   A new rider can get on the road for under £2,000 including a new 125cc scooter, kit and the basic training (CBT) that is required:  a more cost-effective option than four wheels and ideal for younger people who need to get to work or college on a limited budget.
  • Regular: the average motorcyclist relies on their bike for everyday transport, using it for over one-third of all journeys they make.
MCI Spokesperson Sheila Rainger said, "Motorcycle and scooter riders are capitalising on the cost-effective, practical benefits of using a powered two-wheeler during some of the busiest times of the day.
"It is important that the Government and employers recognise the contribution riders are making to ensure workers are getting to the 'office' quicker and cheaper than some of their colleagues. Cheaper parking, secure and covered parking and access to bus lanes are just some of the small steps that will improve a biker's experience."