EMAIL REF: RIEJU WINS MCM GROUP TEST/GET ON/NEW LEARNER LICENCES
June 24 2012.


EMAIL REF: RIEJU WINS MCM GROUP TEST/GET ON/NEW LEARNER LICENCES:

Here we go again, how can the Rieju be the group test winner. The Generic Worx is virtually half the price of the Rieju, according to MCM 20mpg better as well. The Generc Worx is stylish, well made & economical & with a 2 year warranty for £1699 is best value commuter/ learner bike out there at the moment by far, it should have won the test hands down.

Also whilst I am in the mood for a rant, are you aware that if you do not stock a franchise of one of the brands that have signed up to the Get On Scheme, then as a dealer you can not be included in any of the promotions. Surely this will isolate a large number of independent dealers from the proposed referrals and road shows Get On are planning.

Our shop is based on the outskirts of Liverpool. I was informed that as soon as Phase 2 kicks off we will be removed from the Get On web site and will no longer receive any email referrals. Thanks for that - Despite actively promoting Get On in our shop for the past 12 months we are now cast aside.

It's pretty obvious looking at the proposed Get On Road Shows that certain dealerships are set to benefit more than the rest of us.

Final question. Can someone please explain the forthcoming leaner motorcycles licence laws. Up to now most of the material I have read is focussed on the training school angle and not the dealers selling vehicles. Basically, at present if a 17 yr old passes their test on a geared 125cc, they are restricted to 33BHP for 2 years, then can ride anything. Likewise, a 21yr old plus can go direct access & ride any bike they choose. So with the new proposals, if a 17 Yr old passes their test on a 125cc, is that all they can ride, or will they receive some form of power restriction until 19/21/24 and an incentive to take the test?

I never passed my test just to take a pillion, it was to gain access to a bigger/faster bike.

This new licence legislation looks likely to push youngsters straight into cars due to the multiple tests and training required to gain a access to a larger bike. This will have a major affect on dealers new/ used bike sales and viability long term as our more mature customer base diminishes, there will be no new blood to replace them.

Dealers need to be clear on which bikes can be sold to the various age groups/qualifications with the new licence laws.


John Powell
Bridge Road Motorcycles